Difference Between The Basic Masala in Konkani Cuisine.

This is an old post of mine which I would like to share with all of you here. Base of GSB Konkani cooking:
  1. Sukke– Sukkein in Konkani means dry. It is a dry preparation which makes use of coconut, roasted red chillies, tamarind and urad dal roasted in a little oil and ground to a coarse paste. Seasoned with mustard, or mustard n curry leaves.
  1. Sagle– Sagle in Konkani literally means whole. That means dt the vegetable is kept intact with a couple of slits and without chopping into fine pieces. Coconut, roasted red chillies, tamarind and roasted coriander seeds and methi seeds are ground together to a coarse paste. The masala is medium spicy. The seasoning is of mustard, or mustard n curry leaves in coconut oil.
  1. Ghashi – It is usually a gravy of coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind ground to a smooth paste. Again this too is not very spicy and seasoned in coconut oil with mustard n curry leaves. Generally pulses like moong, toor and chana are used to make ghashi. Another method of making ghashi is by coarsely grinding teppal/ Triphal with the masala and drizzling coconut oil after boiling the ghashi. Jen avro/ kutch Val, tingalavro / navy beans or even Alsandya bee/ black eyed beans / chawli are used.
  1. Koddel– a spicy preparation of coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind. The quantity of coconut used is less in comparison to ghashi, sukkein or Sagle. The masala is ground to a smooth paste and it is seasoned with lots of garlic in coconut oil. Koddel could be of fresh vegetables like magge or Mangalore cucumber, raw banana or of Kulith/ horse gram or Alsandya bee/ black eyed beans or chawli.
  1. Humman– a spicy gravy of coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind ground to a fine paste and which has to be boiled well. Drizzled with fresh coconut oil n asafoetida. ( hinga uddak) It is not seasoned. Once the oil n asafoetida water is drizzled it is kept tightly covered so that the masala gets infused. Potato and double beans are generally used to make humman.
  1. Bendhi – this is a spicy gravy ground fine with less of coconut and more of roasted red chillies and tamarind. Seasoning of lot of garlic in coconut oil. Bendhi is generally made with pulses like black toor/kali tori, tingalavro /navy beans.
  1. Ambatta– ambat can be made with or without the addition of cooked toor dal to the masala. Coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind is ground together to a smooth paste and any chopped vegetable of your choice can be used. It is seasoned with onions in coconut oil. Peas, cauliflower, ivy gourd/tendle or even onion is used as the vegetable of choice.
  1. Bhuthi– This is a preparation where onions are used in the seasoning along with mustard. Masala again is of coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind ground to a coarse paste. Usually bhuthi is made with ivy gourd/tendle, jeev kadgi/ a variety of raw jackfruit or onions themselves used both in seasoning and as vegetable of choice.
  1. Tamballi– this is a cold preparation. Coconut, roasted red chillies and tamarind are ground to a very smooth paste and chopped onions are added as garnish. Drizzled with coconut oil. This preparation is not heated and thus not prepared in advance.
  1. Bhaartha– This too is a cold preparation where the ground masala of coconut, roasted red chillies, ginger and tamarind is not heated. The difference is in the addition of adding cooked and mashed vegetables like brinjal or ghosale/ ridge gourd to the masala and n raw onions are added as garnish n drizzled with coconut oil.
  1. Kismoori– This used to be traditionally made with either fried bitter gourd/karathe or sooran/yam. But of late, beans, spring onions and even carrot is used, the first two being shallow fried and the last eaten raw. Kismoori is of two types. One is with grated coconut, green chillies and onions minced, salt and coconut oil. This is added to the fried karathe or sooran just before serving. Same is with the other vegetables too which need to be cooled before the garnish is added. The second variety of Kismoori is coconut, roasted red chillies, ginger and tamarind ground to a coarse paste. Finely chopped onions salt and coconut oil are mixed with the masala and this again is added to the karathe/bitter gourd or sooran /yam just before serving.
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